Exploring Different Cultures: A Guide for Educators

In today’s fast-paced world, companies are often focused on their ‘doing culture’ – that is, their ability to produce and deliver goods and services efficiently. However, a ‘being culture’ is equally important, if not more so. A ‘being culture’ is one that emphasizes the values, beliefs, and attitudes of its employees, and encourages them to be their best selves. While a ‘doing culture’ is focused on outcomes, a ‘being culture’ is focused on the journey and the growth of the individual. In this article, we will explore the differences between these two cultures and how they impact the success of a company.

Quick Answer:
Being culture refers to a workplace culture that emphasizes the importance of personal growth, self-awareness, and introspection. It prioritizes the individual’s well-being and encourages employees to be true to themselves. In contrast, doing culture focuses on outcomes and productivity, with an emphasis on achieving results and meeting goals. This type of culture places more importance on task completion and efficiency, rather than the individual’s personal growth or happiness. Being culture is often associated with more creative and innovative workplaces, while doing culture is more commonly found in traditional, hierarchical organizations. Ultimately, the main difference between being and doing culture is the emphasis placed on the individual versus the outcome.

Defining Being and Doing Culture

Being Culture

Emphasizes on who a person is and how they fit into the organization

Being culture is a type of organizational culture that emphasizes on the personal qualities, skills, and characteristics of an employee. It focuses on who a person is and how they fit into the organization. In a being culture, employees are valued for their individuality and creativity, and their personal characteristics are considered important in determining their role within the organization.

Values employee’s personal qualities, skills, and characteristics

Being culture values the personal qualities, skills, and characteristics of an employee. It recognizes that each employee is unique and has their own strengths and weaknesses. In a being culture, employees are encouraged to express their individuality and creativity, and their personal characteristics are considered important in determining their role within the organization.

Encourages employees to express their individuality and creativity

Being culture encourages employees to express their individuality and creativity. It recognizes that each employee is unique and has their own strengths and weaknesses. In a being culture, employees are encouraged to be themselves and to bring their unique perspective to the organization. This type of culture fosters a sense of belonging and helps employees feel more connected to the organization.

Focuses on building relationships and trust among team members

Being culture focuses on building relationships and trust among team members. It recognizes that employees are more likely to be productive and engaged when they feel connected to their colleagues and the organization. In a being culture, employees are encouraged to build relationships and trust with their colleagues, which helps to create a positive and supportive work environment. This type of culture also helps to foster a sense of community and belonging among team members.

Doing Culture

Focus on Outcomes

Doing culture places a strong emphasis on the outcomes and results achieved by employees. This type of culture values employee productivity, performance, and their ability to meet targets and objectives. The focus is on what employees do and how they contribute to the organization‘s success.

Goal-Oriented Mindset

In a doing culture, employees are encouraged to be goal-driven and results-oriented. The organization’s leadership sets clear expectations and objectives, and employees are expected to work towards achieving those goals. This mindset creates a sense of urgency and motivates employees to perform at their best.

Output-Driven

Doing culture values the output and contributions of employees. The organization measures success based on the achievement of goals and the attainment of desired results. This focus on output drives employees to be more productive and efficient in their work.

Continuous Improvement

Doing culture also emphasizes continuous improvement. The organization encourages employees to seek new ways to improve processes, products, and services. This approach fosters innovation and drives the organization to be more competitive in the marketplace.

In summary, doing culture is focused on what employees do and how they contribute to the organization‘s success. It values employee output, productivity, and performance, and encourages a goal-oriented and continuous improvement mindset.

The Importance of Culture in an Organization

Key takeaway: The text discusses the difference between being and doing culture in an organization. Being culture values employee’s personal qualities, skills, and characteristics, while doing culture values employee productivity, performance, and their ability to meet targets and objectives. Culture matters in an organization as it creates a sense of belonging and identity among employees, shapes employee behavior and decision-making, impacts employee engagement, motivation, and satisfaction, and influences the organization’s reputation and brand image. It is important for organizations to carefully consider the specific needs and values of their employees when developing and implementing their cultural strategies.

Why Culture Matters

Culture matters in an organization for several reasons. Firstly, it creates a sense of belonging and identity among employees. When employees feel that they are part of a culture, they are more likely to feel committed to the organization and its goals. This sense of belonging can also foster a sense of pride and loyalty among employees, which can lead to increased job satisfaction and retention.

Secondly, culture shapes employee behavior and decision-making. The values, beliefs, and norms of an organization can influence how employees behave and make decisions. For example, if an organization values innovation, employees may be more likely to take risks and think creatively in their work. On the other hand, if an organization values conformity, employees may be more likely to follow established procedures and avoid taking risks.

Thirdly, culture impacts employee engagement, motivation, and satisfaction. When employees feel that they fit well with the culture of an organization, they are more likely to be engaged and motivated to perform well. Additionally, when employees feel that the culture aligns with their own values and beliefs, they are more likely to feel satisfied with their work and the organization as a whole.

Finally, culture influences the organization’s reputation and brand image. The way that an organization is perceived by external stakeholders, such as customers and investors, is often tied to its culture. For example, if an organization is known for being innovative and forward-thinking, it may be more likely to attract customers and investors who value those qualities. On the other hand, if an organization is known for being rigid and unresponsive, it may be less appealing to those who value flexibility and adaptability.

The Impact of Culture on Employee Engagement

Being culture is a type of organizational culture that emphasizes the values, beliefs, and behaviors of an organization. It is characterized by a strong sense of community and collaboration among employees, and is often associated with a family-like atmosphere. On the other hand, doing culture is a type of organizational culture that is focused on achieving goals and getting things done. It is characterized by a strong emphasis on results and performance, and is often associated with a more competitive atmosphere.

The impact of culture on employee engagement is a topic that has been widely studied and discussed in the field of organizational behavior. There are several ways in which organizational culture can affect employee engagement, including:

  • Being culture fosters a sense of loyalty and commitment among employees. In a being culture, employees are often seen as part of a larger community or family, and are expected to contribute to the organization’s success in a collaborative and supportive way. This can lead to a strong sense of belonging and commitment among employees, which can in turn increase their level of engagement and motivation.
  • Doing culture encourages employees to take ownership of their work and contribute to the organization’s success. In a doing culture, employees are often encouraged to take initiative and be proactive in achieving goals and driving results. This can lead to a sense of ownership and accountability among employees, which can increase their level of engagement and motivation.

Overall, the impact of culture on employee engagement is complex and multifaceted. While both being and doing cultures can have positive effects on employee engagement, it is important for organizations to carefully consider the specific needs and values of their employees when developing and implementing their cultural strategies.

The Connection between Being and Doing Culture

The Balance between Being and Doing Culture

While Being Culture focuses on the emotional well-being and personal growth of employees, Doing Culture emphasizes task completion and productivity. However, these two aspects of organizational culture are not mutually exclusive, and in fact, a balance between the two can create a healthy and productive work environment.

Achieving the right balance between Being and Doing Culture can be challenging, as different employees may have different needs and preferences. Some employees may thrive in a more collaborative and supportive environment, while others may prefer a more goal-oriented and task-focused approach. Additionally, the balance may vary depending on the organization’s goals, objectives, and culture.

However, it is essential to recognize the importance of both Being and Doing Culture in creating a successful and sustainable work environment. By prioritizing both employee well-being and productivity, organizations can foster a culture that promotes engagement, motivation, and job satisfaction. This, in turn, can lead to increased retention rates, improved performance, and ultimately, greater success for the organization.

The Relationship between Being and Doing Culture

Being Culture shapes how employees think and behave

Being Culture refers to the values, beliefs, and attitudes that define an organization’s identity and shape the mindset of its employees. It encompasses the organization’s purpose, vision, mission, and culture, which together influence how employees perceive their work and their role within the organization. Being Culture sets the tone for the overall work environment and provides employees with a sense of direction and meaning.

Doing Culture shapes what employees do and how they contribute to the organization

Doing Culture, on the other hand, focuses on the actions and behaviors of employees in relation to their work. It encompasses the organization’s processes, systems, and structures, which define how work is done and how employees contribute to the organization’s goals. Doing Culture includes elements such as decision-making processes, communication styles, and performance management practices.

The relationship between Being and Doing Culture is reciprocal and interdependent

The relationship between Being and Doing Culture is not one-directional but rather reciprocal and interdependent. Being Culture sets the stage for what employees believe in and how they behave, while Doing Culture determines what employees do and how they contribute to the organization. The two are closely connected and mutually reinforce each other.

When an organization has a strong Being Culture, it fosters a sense of shared purpose and identity among employees, which in turn influences their actions and behaviors in the workplace. A clear vision and mission statement, for example, can inspire employees to align their work with the organization’s goals and values, shaping their behavior and actions.

On the other hand, Doing Culture influences how employees perceive their work and their role within the organization. The processes, systems, and structures of an organization can either support or hinder employees’ ability to contribute to the organization’s goals. For instance, if an organization has a rigid hierarchical structure, it may inhibit employees’ ability to take initiative and contribute to the organization’s goals, even if they share the same values and beliefs as the organization.

In conclusion, the relationship between Being and Doing Culture is reciprocal and interdependent. A strong Being Culture shapes how employees think and behave, while a strong Doing Culture shapes what employees do and how they contribute to the organization. Both aspects are critical to an organization’s success and must be aligned to create a positive work environment that fosters employee engagement and contribution.

The Challenges of Managing Culture

The Challenges of Balancing Being and Doing Culture

Balancing Being and Doing Culture can be challenging for managers

  • Managers need to balance the need for individuality and creativity with the need for productivity and efficiency
  • Balancing being and doing culture requires a deep understanding of the organization’s values, goals, and objectives
  • Managers must consider the needs and preferences of their employees while ensuring that the organization’s culture remains aligned with its strategic objectives

Managers need to strike a balance between promoting individuality and encouraging productivity

  • Being culture focuses on individuality, creativity, and personal growth
  • Doing culture emphasizes productivity, efficiency, and achievement
  • Managers must strike a balance between these two cultures to create a work environment that is both supportive and challenging
  • This balance can be achieved by promoting individuality and creativity while also setting clear goals and expectations for productivity

Managers need to understand the needs and preferences of their employees

  • Different employees have different needs and preferences when it comes to work culture
  • Some employees may prefer a more collaborative and supportive work environment, while others may thrive in a more competitive and challenging environment
  • Managers must understand the needs and preferences of their employees and create a work environment that meets the needs of all employees
  • This can be achieved by involving employees in the decision-making process and soliciting feedback on work culture and practices.

The Challenges of Maintaining Culture

Maintaining a strong and positive culture can be challenging for organizations

Maintaining a strong and positive culture can be challenging for organizations because it requires continuous effort and attention. It is not enough to simply establish a culture and then let it run on autopilot. Organizations must actively work to sustain and strengthen their culture over time. This requires a commitment to ongoing communication, feedback, and learning, as well as a willingness to adapt and evolve as the organization grows and changes.

Organizations need to continuously monitor and assess their culture

Organizations need to continuously monitor and assess their culture to ensure that it remains strong and positive. This involves regularly gathering feedback from employees, conducting culture assessments, and tracking key metrics such as employee engagement and satisfaction. It also requires a willingness to listen to and act on feedback, even if it is negative or challenging. By monitoring and assessing their culture, organizations can identify areas of strength and weakness, and take proactive steps to address any issues that arise.

Organizations need to address cultural issues and conflicts proactively

Organizations need to address cultural issues and conflicts proactively to maintain a strong and positive culture. This means being willing to have difficult conversations, address conflicts head-on, and take action to address any issues that arise. It also requires a commitment to transparency and open communication, as well as a willingness to listen to and learn from others. By addressing cultural issues and conflicts proactively, organizations can maintain a healthy and positive culture that supports their mission and values.

FAQs

1. What is a being culture?

A being culture is a type of organizational culture that emphasizes the importance of being and expressing oneself. It encourages individuals to focus on their inner selves, emotions, and personal growth. In a being culture, employees are encouraged to express their opinions, feelings, and emotions freely. This type of culture is often found in organizations that value individuality, creativity, and personal fulfillment.

2. What is a doing culture?

A doing culture is a type of organizational culture that emphasizes action and productivity. It encourages individuals to focus on achieving goals, completing tasks, and producing results. In a doing culture, employees are expected to work hard, be efficient, and prioritize tasks over emotions or personal needs. This type of culture is often found in organizations that value efficiency, performance, and productivity.

3. What are the characteristics of a being culture?

The characteristics of a being culture include a focus on individuality, creativity, and personal fulfillment. Employees are encouraged to express their opinions, feelings, and emotions freely, and to prioritize their personal needs and well-being. There is a strong emphasis on work-life balance, and employees are often given the flexibility to work from home or set their own schedules. Communication is open and honest, and there is a sense of community and belonging within the organization.

4. What are the characteristics of a doing culture?

The characteristics of a doing culture include a focus on productivity, efficiency, and results. Employees are expected to work hard, be efficient, and prioritize tasks over emotions or personal needs. There is a strong emphasis on achieving goals and meeting deadlines, and employees are often rewarded for their performance and productivity. Communication is direct and to the point, and there is a sense of competition and individualism within the organization.

5. How can I determine which culture is right for my organization?

To determine which culture is right for your organization, you should consider your business goals, values, and priorities. If you value creativity, innovation, and personal fulfillment, a being culture may be a good fit. If you value efficiency, productivity, and results, a doing culture may be a better fit. It’s important to remember that every organization is unique, and there is no one-size-fits-all approach to organizational culture. The best approach is to create a culture that aligns with your values and priorities, and that supports the needs and goals of your employees and your business.

Pathways to Stillness Podcast – A Culture of Doing Vs. Being

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